BASIC MEMBERSHIP

AMERICAN REDNECK SOCIETY (ARS)

Basic Membership Benefits 

Our mission is to create benefits for the many not available to the individual. In other words, a large society of rednecks can negotiate great discounts and opportunities for each member that individual rednecks cannot do on their own. As ARS grows, so too will the benefits and opportunities for each member of ARS. Here’s what y’all have access to now.

 Basic Membership for Life: Once you become a basic member of the American Redneck Society, you will receive these basic benefits for life . . . no strings attached. We can see for yourself that there's a Premium Membership for Life that will cost you some money, with some additional benefits. But, the Basic Membership is the key to the success of the American Redneck Society. It's only by having an incredibly large number of members can we hope to obtain valuable benefits for all members of ARS, both Basic and Premium. 

Identity Personalized ID Card that you can print out yourself. With a membership card from the American Redneck Society (ARS) provided to all members, you can proudly declare that you’re a card-carrying-redneck.

Become part of a community of rednecks who share a sense of humor and a sense of country.

Receive e-mail updates and news about redneck happenings. To promote the sense of community among rednecks and to keep you informed with the benefits we're working on for you, you'll receive periodic e-mails from our headquarters on Redneck Boulevard. 

Receive complimentary access to tax tips and tricks on how to legally avoid paying too much money to the Ruling Class. Our taxes are too high, because our government spends too much money. While we can hold our breaths hoping for the government to spend less and reduce our taxes, we will help you help yourself by providing practical advice on how to legally reduce your income taxes. The United State Supreme Court assures us that we have the right to look for ways to reduce our tax bill. "The legal right of a taxpayer to decrease the amount of what otherwise would be his taxes, or altogether avoid them, by means which the law permits, cannot be doubted." (Gregory v. Helvering, Commissioner of the Revenue, Decided January 7, 1935).


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